Job: The Story of a Holocaust Survivor

By Joseph Freeman | Go to book overview

Chapter Seven
Selections for the Death Camps

The selecting and killing went on for hours. Meanwhile, the SS took approximately one hundred young men from our group and put them to work collecting the dead strewn everywhere in pools of blood, dragging them to horse wagons, piling them on top of each other. Wagons full of bodies were driven from the ghetto and buried in a large ditch at Pentz Garden. In 1945, I visited the graveyard and said Kaddish in their memory.

We stood for hours in the middle of the marketplace, the leftovers, the temporary survivors of the community. Some of us passed out from hunger and exhaustion. The rest of us prayed, looking to the sky. Based on what we had seen that day, we believed there was no chance for our survival. And we ceased to care what would happen next. Those who passed out were pulled from the group and killed there in front of us. We wondered if we would be next.

At 5:30 in the evening, the SS told those who remained to go back home. We dragged my crippled brother and went upstairs to our apartment, tired, hungry, shocked, and unable to think of what to do. Crying and hugging each other, we had no words. Each time we started to talk, it turned to tears. My father took Elek to a chair, gave him some water, and tried to comfort him. My brother held his hand and looked up at him. Then my father placed him on the bed and gave him a piece of

-26-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Job: The Story of a Holocaust Survivor
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Dedication v
  • Note about the Publication vi
  • Contents vii
  • Maps ix
  • Preface xi
  • Introduction xiii
  • Part One - Before the Destruction 1
  • Chapter One - Early School Years in Radom 3
  • Chapter Two - Father’s Family in Staszow 6
  • Chapter Three - Gymnasium and University Years 11
  • Part Two - Hashoah 13
  • Chapter Four - September 1,1939 15
  • Chapter Five - Walowa Street Ghetto 18
  • Chapter Six - How the City of Radom Died 22
  • Chapter Seven - Selections for Trie Death Camps 26
  • Chapter Eight - Kromolowsky Factory 30
  • Chapter Nine - Business at Kromolowsky 33
  • Chapter Ten - Isaac 36
  • Chapter Eleven - The Ghetto Reduced 39
  • Chapter Twelve - Winter 1942–43 42
  • Chapter Thirteen - ‘Exchange’ of Intellectuals 45
  • Chapter Fourteen - Letters 48
  • Chapter Fifteen - Szkolna 50
  • Chapter Sixteen - Auschwitz 53
  • Chapter Seventeen - Vaihingen 56
  • Chapter Eighteen - Schoemberg 59
  • Chapter Nineteen - First Day 62
  • Chapter Twenty - Order 64
  • Chapter Twenty- One - Lester 67
  • Chapter Twenty-Two - Lying with the Dead 72
  • Chapter Twenty-Three - Hospital in Schoemberg 75
  • Chapter Twenty-Four - Transports 79
  • Chapter Twenty-Five - Spaichingen 82
  • Part Three - Rebirth 85
  • Chapter Twenty-Six - Liberation 87
  • Chapter Twenty-Seven - Hospital in Fussen 89
  • Chapter Twenty-Eight - Feldafing 93
  • Chapter Twenty-Nine - Return to Radom 97
  • Chapter Thirty - Helen 99
  • Chapter Thirty-One - Munich 102
  • Chapter Thirty-Two - Pasadena 106
  • Chapter Thirty-Three - Broken Silence 109
  • Chapter Thirty-Four - Return to the Ruins 115
  • Chapter Thirty-Five - Gates of Tomorrow 118
  • Glossary 122
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 129

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.