CHAPTER V
EXPLORATIONS

THE college term ended in July, and Frank lost no time in setting out upon his summer excursion in company with his friend, Henry Orne White:

July 15th, '42. Albany. Left Boston this morning at half-past six, for this place, where I am now happily arrived, it being the longest day's journey I ever made. For all that, I would rather have come thirty miles by stage than the whole distance by railroad, for of all methods of progressing, that by steam is incomparably the most disgusting. . . .

July 16th. Caldwell. This morning we left Albany--which I devoutly hope I may never see again--in the cars, for Saratoga. . . . After passing the inclined plane and riding a couple of hours, we reached the valley of the Mohawk and Schenectady. I was prepared for something filthy in the last mentioned venerable town, but for nothing quite so disgusting as the reality. Canal docks, full of stinking water, superannuated rotten canal-boats, and dirty children and pigs paddling about formed the foreground of the delicious picture, while in the rear was a mass of tumbling houses and sheds, bursting

-32-

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Francis Parkman
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • Francis Parkman 1
  • Chapter II- Ancestry 12
  • Chapter III- Boyhood 20
  • Chapter IV- College 27
  • Chapter V- Explorations 32
  • Chapter VI- The Margalloway 45
  • Chapter X- Naples and Rome 90
  • Chapter XI- From Florence to Edinburgh 105
  • Chapter XII- A Make-Believe Law Student 116
  • Chapter XIII- Preparation for Pontiac 133
  • Chapter XIV- Off on the Oregon Trail 148
  • Chapter XV- The Ogillallah 160
  • Chapter XVI- A Rough Journey 168
  • Chapter XVII- Life in an Indian Village 181
  • Chapter XVIII- Under Dr. Elliott''s Care 193
  • Chapter XIX- Ill Health, 1848-1850 205
  • Chapter XX- Life and Literature, 1850-1856 217
  • Chapter XXI- 1858-1865 229
  • Chapter XXII- History and Fame 246
  • Chapter XXIII- Canada and Canadian Friends 263
  • Chapter XXIV- Later Life 282
  • Chapter XXV- Character and Opinions 304
  • Chapter XXVI- A More Intimate Chapter 316
  • Appendix 327
  • Index 341
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