Psychology in Diabetes Care

By Frank J. Snoek; T. Chas Skinner | Go to book overview

Foreword to the First Edition

Diabetes is a very human condition. Even to those of us with many years of clinical practice in diabetes, the infinite diversity of individual response to diabetes is a constant source of amazement but also professional enhancement. People are different and behave differently, and often unexpectedly. This is what makes involvement in diabetes care such a three-dimensional experience. Diabetes and its consequences have a fundamental physical basis, but these are deeply intertwined with complex psychosocial issues. Such interrelationships are considerable: sometimes subtle; sometimes overwhelming.

Awareness of these issues is crucial to enabling people with diabetes to lead a healthy and fulfilled life. Empathy and appreciation of the psycho-social needs of patients are essential requirements for those involved in diabetes care, and indeed most do seem to acquire that intuitive understanding of patient-professional relationships so fundamental to good clinical care. However, the world of psychology has progressed; much more is known and the evidence base of psychological management in diabetes care is becoming clearer.

Despite the widespread and increasing prevalence of diabetes in the population, the diagnosis at a personal level can still be a considerable shock and source of distress to the individual and family concerned. Suddenly a label is applied that seemingly sets them aside from others, that invokes dire consequences to both current well-being and to future health. Such initial fears and misgivings may result from misunderstandings and ignorant, albeit well intentioned, advice from others. The misguided term ‘mild diabetes’ may be used inappropriately to allay fears and anxieties, but in so doing it undermines the essential need to manage diabetes with due consideration and respect.

Recent published studies and clinical experience indicate that future prospects for people with diabetes should be very positive and encouraging, but despite the substantial improvements in treatments and technology a demanding daily discipline is still required.

Realistic information and education needs to be very much geared to the individual, taking into account the very diversity of such individual needs and perspectives. Necessary messages should be understood, but balancing the immediate influences on quality of life with longer term objectives on future health. Living with diabetes is a lifelong educational exercise and a similar experience for those involved in diabetes care. No amount of theoretical knowledge can match

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Psychology in Diabetes Care
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 205

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.