Patriotism and Propaganda in First World War Britain: The National War Aims Committee and Civilian Morale

By David Monger | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

ANY list of acknowledgements must begin with my parents, who fostered my interest in history, paid substantial parts of the costs of my education, listened to various gripes, whinges and a probably unreasonable share of ill-temper, and did many other things beyond. Thanks.

Further thanks are appropriate to a string of patient and differently inspiring teachers, from Warren Davies and Malcolm Day at William Parker School, to Joanna De Groot, Alan Forrest, Mark Ormrod and Shane O’Rourke at the University of York, each of whom drove my development as a historian and otherwise through their enthusiasm, rigour, good nature and high expectations. Among other debts accumulated at York (social, economic and otherwise) I am delighted to be able to fulfil my part of a bargain with David Mutton with this acknowledgement, unlikely as it seemed at the time. Postgraduate work at King’s College London was a stimulating, challenging experience, thanks particularly to Richard Vinen and his dancing eyebrows, along with Bill Philpott and Paul Readman, whose courses drove me towards the subject of this book. My PhD research, of which this book is the product, was the result of timely advice from Adrian Gregory, whose response to an email from an unknown MA student was that the NWAC might be a good topic for someone wanting to study First World War patriotism. Once I had worked out what the NWAC was, I was on my way!

Staff at King’s College London ensured I did not rest on my laurels, and I am grateful to Arthur Burns and Richard Vinen for a demanding upgrade viva, which helped to shape my ideas into the form they now take, rather than the somewhat more derivative version of the time, as well as to Bill for generous and supportive help as second supervisor, and to Paul for regular and unstinting attention, encouragement and criticism (as required). I hope that my own attention to students’ needs is somewhere approaching the example I was set.

The experience of the PhD was enriched by many other people. I am grateful to Adam Sutcliffe, then the organiser of the departmental

-x-

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