Patriotism and Propaganda in First World War Britain: The National War Aims Committee and Civilian Morale

By David Monger | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 10
Individual and Local Reactions
to the NWAC

THE NWAC did not enjoy the complete confidence of parliament or the national press, but it was geared towards convincing neither parliamentarians nor journalists but the general public. This chapter, therefore, discusses the Committee’s public reception. It is difficult to assess individual civilians’ reactions to the NWAC. Diaries and autobiographies rarely mention the organisation specifically, and general allusions to propaganda must be treated cautiously, particularly since such discussion often focuses on the recruitment propaganda of the early years. Nonetheless, it is possible to make some assessment of the NWAC’s reception, through official judgements of its effectiveness, including speakers’ reports of individual meetings, through local press reports of events and through public correspondence with the Committee or local newspapers. This chapter examines these various indications of the NWAC’s public reception. Each type, in isolation, is limited by possibilities of private, political or official agendas or self-justification. Neither individually nor in combination do they provide anything like a complete image of public reception. However, some suspicions of bias or atypicality can be allayed by comparison of the different forms of evidence. In combination, they suggest the Committee succeeded in gaining receptive and, significantly, often attentive audiences, even in some troublesome areas. While it did not attain universal success, it apparently played an important part in maintaining civilian resolution and effort.

BY July 1917, the War Cabinet had two consistent sources of information on public opinion: the MoL’s weekly reports on the ‘Labour Situation’ and fortnightly reports on ‘Pacifist and Revolutionary Organisations’ by Basil Thomson at CID. Neither organisation was entirely disinterested, but equally neither had any incentive to praise or criticise the NWAC. As such, their reports are valuable guides to official assessments of NWAC achievements, and much more impartial than equivalent judgements by the Committee itself or its denigrators. This

-242-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Patriotism and Propaganda in First World War Britain: The National War Aims Committee and Civilian Morale
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 314

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.