Poetry & Geography: Space and Place in Post-War Poetry

By Neal Alexander; David Cooper | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 7
‘I know this labyrinth so well’:
Narrative Mappings in the
Poetry of Ciaran Carson

Daniel Weston

Walking the streets is what links up reading the map with living
one’s life, the personal microcosm with the public macrocosm; it
makes sense of the maze all around.1

Perhaps the way out of the labyrinth is to get deeper into it, more
fully to explore its ramifications.2

Read together, these two epigraphs sound several keynotes for this essay. In the first, Rebecca Solnit remarks on the way in which a particular practice of space – walking – constitutes a means by which to bring together and establish dialogues between the representational (mapped) and experiential (lived) registers of a place. In this way, the maze is ‘made sense of’ – what was confusing becomes clear. Walking offers resolution. The second statement, given by Carson in interview with Elmer Kennedy-Andrews, might be read in a similar vein. Here, ‘exploring’ – an activity that, for Carson, would most often take place on foot – plays a comparable role, offering reconciliation if not resolution. However, Carson’s terminology and phrasing is characteristically ambiguous, even paradoxical: to find the way out of the labyrinth is also to move deeper into it. If, for Solnit, the maze-like qualities of urban space are to be overcome, then, for Carson, they are also to be embraced. Carson’s purpose has often been to recognise the complicated interaction of the various perspectives on place that are inscribed in variant modes – walking the streets, reading maps, reading poems – of experiencing and representing urban landscape.

If Northern Irish politics and history have played a large part in conditioning critical readings of the province’s poetry, Carson scholarship has increasingly tended to read him primarily as a poet

-105-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Poetry & Geography: Space and Place in Post-War Poetry
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 272

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.