Poetry & Geography: Space and Place in Post-War Poetry

By Neal Alexander; David Cooper | Go to book overview

Notes on Contributors

Neal Alexander is Lecturer in English Literature at the University of Nottingham. He is the author of Ciaran Carson: Space, Place, Writing (Liverpool University Press, 2010) and co-editor (with James Moran) of Regional Modernisms (forthcoming 2013). His current project is a study of literary geographies in Britain and Ireland since 1960.

Charles I. Armstrong is Head of the Department of Foreign Languages and Translation, University of Agder. He is the author of Romantic Organicism: From Idealist Origins to Ambivalent Afterlife (2003) and Figures of Memory: Poetry, Space, and the Past (2009); and co-editor of Postcolonial Dislocations: Travel, History and the Ironies of Narrative (2006) and Crisis and Contemporary Poetry (2011).

Peter Barry is Professor of English at Aberystwyth University. His books include Contemporary British Poetry and the City (2000), Beginning Theory (2002), English in Practice (2003), Poetry Wars: British Poetry of the 1970s and the Battle of Earls Court (2006) and Literature in Contexts (2007). His forthcoming publications include the monographs Reading Poetry and Continuing Theory; and he is editing the volume on Contemporary Poetry for the Continuum Companions Series.

Scott Brewster is Reader in English and Irish Literature, and Director of English, at the University of Salford. He is the author of Lyric (2009); and he has co-edited Ireland in Proximity: History, Gender, Space (1999), Inhuman Reflections: Thinking the Limits of the Human (2000) and Irish Literature since 1900: Diverse Voices (2009). He is currently writing a book on Freud and commemoration.

Lucy Collins is Lecturer in English Literature at University College Dublin. She has published widely on contemporary Irish and American poetry, including essays on Thomas Kinsella, Eileán Ní Chuilleanáin

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