APPENDIX

LETTER written to Mr. Martin Brimmer in 1886, with instructions to be kept until after Parkman's death, and then to be given to the Massachusetts Historical Society:--

MY DEAR BRIMMER,--I once told you that I
should give you some account of the circumstances
under which my books were written. Here it is, with
some preliminary pages to explain the rest. I am
sorry there is so much of it:--

Causes antedating my birth gave me constitutional
liabilities to which I largely ascribe the mischief that
ensued. As a child I was sensitive and restless, rarely
ill, but never robust. At eight years I was sent to a
farm belonging to my maternal grandfather on the
outskirts of the extensive tract of wild and rough
woodland now called Middlesex Fells. I walked
twice a day to a school of high but undeserved repu-
tation about a mile distant, in the town of Medford.
Here I learned very little, and spent the intervals of
schooling more profitably in collecting eggs, insects,
and reptiles, trapping squirrels and woodchucks, and
making persistent though rarely fortunate attempts

-327-

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Francis Parkman
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • Francis Parkman 1
  • Chapter II- Ancestry 12
  • Chapter III- Boyhood 20
  • Chapter IV- College 27
  • Chapter V- Explorations 32
  • Chapter VI- The Margalloway 45
  • Chapter X- Naples and Rome 90
  • Chapter XI- From Florence to Edinburgh 105
  • Chapter XII- A Make-Believe Law Student 116
  • Chapter XIII- Preparation for Pontiac 133
  • Chapter XIV- Off on the Oregon Trail 148
  • Chapter XV- The Ogillallah 160
  • Chapter XVI- A Rough Journey 168
  • Chapter XVII- Life in an Indian Village 181
  • Chapter XVIII- Under Dr. Elliott''s Care 193
  • Chapter XIX- Ill Health, 1848-1850 205
  • Chapter XX- Life and Literature, 1850-1856 217
  • Chapter XXI- 1858-1865 229
  • Chapter XXII- History and Fame 246
  • Chapter XXIII- Canada and Canadian Friends 263
  • Chapter XXIV- Later Life 282
  • Chapter XXV- Character and Opinions 304
  • Chapter XXVI- A More Intimate Chapter 316
  • Appendix 327
  • Index 341
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