4
A Crown Colony: 1867–1942

Changing trade practices were a key factor in the administrative development of Singapore. While the English East India Company (EEIC) long controlled trade between Asia and Britain, the EEIC’s monopolistic control over that trade had ended, and the company had weakened and was relieved of administrative control of India in 1858. Even before its demise, merchants all over Asia were looking increasingly toward trading houses in London, rather than India, for their business partnerships. This was also facilitated by technological improvements in transportation, specifically the steamship, which allowed for faster communications and trade between Britain and British holdings in Asia. With the end of the EEIC, these stronger direct ties, and the long-term weaknesses of EEIC administration of the Straits Settlements, the British government took direct control of administering Singapore. British colonial authority transformed Singapore in many respects; it grew to greater significance and scale as a trade port, and it experienced major societal changes in the areas of social order and the creation of distinctive identities among the people.

-57-

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The History of Singapore
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Advisory Board ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Series Foreword vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Timeline of Major Events xiii
  • 1 - A Globalized City-State 1
  • 2 - Pre-Colonial Singapore- Temasek, Dragon’s Tooth Gate, and Singapura, 100–1819 13
  • 3 - The Establishment of Colonial Singapore- 1819–1867 37
  • 4 - A Crown Colony- 1867–1942 57
  • 5 - Fortress Singapore to Syonan-to- World War II 83
  • 6 - The Rough Road to Independence- 1945–1963 109
  • 7 - From Third World to First World- Since 1965 133
  • Notable People in the History of Singapore 159
  • Glossary 165
  • Bibliographic Essay 169
  • Index 173
  • About the Author 181
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