Series Foreword

From the Lindy hop to hip-hop, dance has helped define American life and culture. In good times and bad, people have turned to dance to escape their troubles, get out, and have a good time. From high school proms to weddings and other occasions, dance creates some of our most memorable personal moments. It is also big business, with schools, competitions, and dance halls bringing in people and their dollars each year. And as America has changed, so, too, has dance. The story of dance is very much the story of America. Dance routines are featured in movies, television, and videos; dance styles and techniques reflect shifting values and attitudes toward relationships; and dance performers and their costumes reveal changing thoughts about race, class, gender, and other topics. Written for students and general readers, The American Dance Floor series covers the history of social dancing in America.

Each volume in the series looks at a particular type of dance such as swing, disco, Latin, folk dancing, hip-hop, ballroom, and country & western. Written in an engaging manner, each book tells the story of a particular dance form and places it in its historical, social, and cultural context. Thus each title helps the reader learn not only about a particular dance form but also about social change. The volumes are fully documented, and each contains a bibliography of print and electronic resources for further reading.

-vii-

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Latin Dance
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Series Foreword vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction xv
  • 1 - Spanish Latin Dances and Others under the Influence 1
  • 2 - Tropical Latin Dances 27
  • 3 - That Latin Beat- How Latin Dance and Music Got into the United States 51
  • 4 - That Latin Beat- What They Did When They Got Here 73
  • 5 - Latin Exhibition and Art Dance 99
  • Conclusion 123
  • Appendix I - Online Resources 131
  • Appendix II - Latin Dance on Film 133
  • Glossary 137
  • Selected Bibliography 153
  • Index 157
  • About the Author 163
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