William Shakespeare's Twelfth Night

By Harold Bloom | Go to book overview

Choosing the Right Mate
in Twelfth Night

Coppélia Kahn

In [The Comedy of] Errors, the twin provides an affective bridge from filial to individual identity: seeking the twin, the hero finds his mate, but only when he is able to distinguish himself firmly from his twin. In Twelfth Night, we move a step further from the family, and the twin and other doubles function at first as projections of emotional obstacles to identity and then, in Viola and Sebastian, as the fulfillment of a wish for a way around the obstacles. The play abounds in images of engulfment and devouring connected with the sea and love; often it is suggested that love, like the sea, is boundless and voracious, swallowing up the lover. As John Hollander points out, the play is saturated in waters of various sorts, just as two of the main characters (and several of the minor ones) are suffused by their desires. Images of the sea (reinforced by allusions to ships, sailing, and sea-trading), of tears, rain, liquor, urine, and the humors appear frequently. First stated in Orsino’s famous opening speech—

O spirit of love, how quick and fresh art thou,
That notwithstanding thy capacity
Receiveth as the sea, nought enters there,
Of what validity and pitch soe’er,
But falls into abatement and low price,
Even in a minute!

(1.1.9–14)

From Man’s Estate: Masculine Identity in Shakespeare. © 1981 by the Regents of the University of California. University of California Press, 1981.

-41-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
William Shakespeare's Twelfth Night
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Editor’s Note vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Shakespeare’s Many Sorts of Music 7
  • Malvolio and Class Ideology in Twelfth Night 19
  • Nature’s Bias 27
  • Choosing the Right Mate in Twelfth Night 41
  • Plays and Playing in Twelfth Night 47
  • The Principle of Recompense in Twelfth Night 61
  • Language, Theme, and Character in Twelfth Night 75
  • The Orchestration of Twelfth Night - The Rhythm of Restraint and Release 87
  • Shakespeare’s Realism- Viola 109
  • Shakespeare’s Poetical Character in Twelfth Night 129
  • Chronology 147
  • Contributors 149
  • Bibliography 151
  • Acknowledgments 155
  • Index 157
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 171

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.