Metaphorical Theology: Models of God in Religious Language

By Sallie McFague | Go to book overview

3 Models in Science

Midway between the unintelligible and the commonplace, it is metaphor which most produces knowledge.1

Once again, it is a provocative statement by Aristotle which guides us as we now turn to the ways in which models function in various fields of knowledge. Aristotle identifies metaphor, the essence of models, as the primary cause or agent of knowledge. Contemporary thinkers in a wide range of fields, including the natural sciences, anthropology, psychology, sociology, political science, computer science, and the various arts appear to agree with Aristotle, for one of the distinctive marks of mid-twentiethcentury thought is a weakening of the positivistic stranglehold of the last two centuries and an awakening to awareness of the power of metaphor. Interest in metaphors and models ranges from the most comprehensive “root-metaphor” or “archetypes” by which people define their culture and their view of reality to highly specialized, complex scientific models that allow scientists to be articulate about increasingly abstract and otherwise unavailable entities. We begin with the most general uses of models in a variety of fields and move to their most specific functions in atomic physics. We hope that such a survey will not only underscore the importance of metaphorical thinking in fields not usually considered as open to or needing it, but also provide some specific insights to help us better understand models in theology.


Models in the Social Sciences
and Technology

All that has been said about metaphor so far pertains to model, for a model is, in essence, a sustained and systematic metaphor. To characterize war as a chess game is not to employ a passing metaphor, but a model, for it is the structure or set of complex relationships among the chess pieces that tantalizes the mind and lures us to meditate on the model. Perhaps our first and most basic experience with models is the young

-67-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Metaphorical Theology: Models of God in Religious Language
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Preface to the Second Printing x
  • 1- Toward a Metaphorical Theology 1
  • 2- Metaphor, Parable, and Scripture 31
  • 3- Models in Science 67
  • 4- Models in Theology 103
  • 5- God the Father- Model or Idoll 145
  • Conclusion 193
  • Notes 195
  • Index of Authors 223
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 227

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.