Green Day: A Musical Biography

By Kjersti Egerdahl | Go to book overview

CHAPTER THREE
Local Heroes

In 1991, with their lineup and their base of hometown fans solidified, Green Day lined up the first tour with Tré Cool on drums and brought a couple of friends along to help sell merchandise and load gear. Once again, they played a scattered assortment of punk houses, community centers, skate parks, and dive bars across the U.S., depending on the kindness of fans to show up and pull together enough money to get them to the next town. During one show in New Orleans, someone broke into the van and stole all their bags and the cash they’d earned so far. With no money for gas and no extra clothes, the Green Day crew drove through the night to their next stop, the college town of Auburn, Alabama. They played in a living room for a few dozen punks and students, who donated clothes and money to keep the tour going. Meeting such generous people at such a low point was a humbling experience for the band. They earned enough that night to get them to Birmingham, Alabama, where they earned enough to get to the next show, and so on.

The rock ‘n’ roll routine of driving for hours every day, sleeping anywhere they could, and eating whatever was cheap—all for the sake of that one amazing hour on stage—turned the band into a tight-knit unit. The never-ending string of shows allowed Cool to mesh with Billie Joe Armstrong and Mike Dirnt and move from learning John

-33-

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Green Day: A Musical Biography
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Series Foreword vii
  • Timeline ix
  • Chapter One - Sweet Children 1
  • Chapter Two - Lookout! 19
  • Chapter Three - Local Heroes 33
  • Chapter Four - The Big Splash 45
  • Chapter Five - Walking Contradiction 65
  • Chapter Six - Out on a Limb 77
  • Chapter Seven - Early Warning 91
  • Chapter Eight - Rebuilding an Album—And a Career 105
  • Chapter Nine - Idiot Proof 119
  • Chapter Ten - Worth the Fight 131
  • Appendix One - Discography of Lps and Eps 145
  • Appendix Two - Awards 153
  • Further Reading 157
  • Index 163
  • About the Author 175
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