Green Day: A Musical Biography

By Kjersti Egerdahl | Go to book overview

CHAPTER SIX
Out on a Limb

Green Day rallied during their time at home and began developing songs again, but this time they knew things had to change. They wouldn’t sound credible if they just dropped another album full of pissed-off punk from their nice suburban neighborhoods. Armstrong’s family had done a lot to give him a new perspective, and he was not about to pretend that everything was still the same. “Having a son has changed my ideas about life, and I reflect that in my writing,” Armstrong said. “I am a father and I am a husband and I have this relationship with two people, but at the same time I want to be like an arrogant rock ’n’ roll star. The two roles definitely clash.”1

Tré Cool swore the two roles came together at a secret “welcome back” show they played on Valentine’s Day in 1997, for just 150 friends. As he explained it, “We wanted to get them all hooked up! Boy met girl, girl met boy, boy met boy, and girl met girl. We like it when people fall in love at our shows. Also, when they get knocked up in the parking lot. As long as they bring the baby to the next tour and call it Nimrod, it’s fine.”2Nimrod would be the name of their next album, which attempted to bring together their newfound maturity and their own classic punk rock swagger.

Armstrong’s ideas about music had changed along with his life. He, Cool, and Mike Dirnt knew that the next album had to be dif-

-77-

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Green Day: A Musical Biography
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Series Foreword vii
  • Timeline ix
  • Chapter One - Sweet Children 1
  • Chapter Two - Lookout! 19
  • Chapter Three - Local Heroes 33
  • Chapter Four - The Big Splash 45
  • Chapter Five - Walking Contradiction 65
  • Chapter Six - Out on a Limb 77
  • Chapter Seven - Early Warning 91
  • Chapter Eight - Rebuilding an Album—And a Career 105
  • Chapter Nine - Idiot Proof 119
  • Chapter Ten - Worth the Fight 131
  • Appendix One - Discography of Lps and Eps 145
  • Appendix Two - Awards 153
  • Further Reading 157
  • Index 163
  • About the Author 175
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