Green Day: A Musical Biography

By Kjersti Egerdahl | Go to book overview

CHAPTER NINE
Idiot Proof

With their new album in the can, Green Day started thinking about how to present the radical new approach of American Idiot to their fans. “We wanted to be firing on all cylinders,” Billie Joe Armstrong said, “Everything from the aesthetic to the music to the look. Just everything.”1 They went back to artist Chris Bilheimer, who had designed the Nimrod and International Superhits album covers, to put together a cohesive look for everything from the album cover to the stage backdrops to the T-shirts. Bilheimer pinpointed a line from “She’s a Rebel” as his inspiration: “And she’s holding on my heart like a hand grenade.” He created the blocky, stencil-style logo of an outstretched hand gripping a heart-shaped grenade, dripping with bold, bright red.

At the same time, the band members took another look at themselves and decided that the crusty punk look they’d coasted on for years wouldn’t cut it now that they had embraced an older, wiser, and more ambitious vision. “They were going to step it up,” Jason Freese remembers, “They said, ‘We’re not gonna wear Hurley shirts onstage anymore. We’re gonna wear suits. We’re gonna wear nice suits too. We don’t want to look like we’re eighteen. We don’t want to look like every other punk band out there.’”2 For their sharp, slim black suits, they went to rock’s king of fashion, Hedi Slimane, who designed

-119-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Green Day: A Musical Biography
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Series Foreword vii
  • Timeline ix
  • Chapter One - Sweet Children 1
  • Chapter Two - Lookout! 19
  • Chapter Three - Local Heroes 33
  • Chapter Four - The Big Splash 45
  • Chapter Five - Walking Contradiction 65
  • Chapter Six - Out on a Limb 77
  • Chapter Seven - Early Warning 91
  • Chapter Eight - Rebuilding an Album—And a Career 105
  • Chapter Nine - Idiot Proof 119
  • Chapter Ten - Worth the Fight 131
  • Appendix One - Discography of Lps and Eps 145
  • Appendix Two - Awards 153
  • Further Reading 157
  • Index 163
  • About the Author 175
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 175

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.