How Psychology Applies to Everyday Life

By Charles I. Brooks; Michael A. Church | Go to book overview

PREFACE

As teachers we find that many students have difficulty doing a literature review on a topic. The availability of search engines and large databases can discourage students from narrowing their topic to something that will result in manageable output from electronic sources. For instance, a student interested in reviewing research comparing the effectiveness of antidepressant medication versus counseling when treating depression might enter “depression treatments” as a search phrase. The resulting output can be hundreds of studies, and the student is overwhelmed.

How Psychology Applies to Everyday Life provides students with a different strategy. We have formed 53 questions about human behavior, questions common to everyday living, such as “Are pets good for our health?” “Should we hide our weaknesses from others?” “Does stress in the mother during pregnancy harm the fetus?” “Does serving size of food affect how much we eat?” Then we describe and analyze a recently published study that offers a simple yes/no answer to the question.

Many readers may wish to go no further; they have learned something about 53 questions related to some aspect of human behavior. Students, however, may be researching the topic for a formal paper, and they may wish to look further into the topic. For them, we provide additional references and suggest how a question can be expanded.

Finally, we include a section with six questions about clinical practice. In this section, which focuses on actual case studies from our files, we deal not so much with questions answered by published research, but with questions answered by clinical experience with clients. We deal with misconceptions about what goes on in counseling and psychotherapy, the use of medications for psychological problems, and, when trying to help people, whether it is appropriate to focus on “why” they do what they do.

As a reference work, How Psychology Applies to Everyday Life is both a source of information on a psychological topic and a portal guiding the reader to further study on that topic. We have also found that How Psychology Applies to Everyday Life can be used as a text in a course on “Current Issues in Psychology” and as supplementary reading for a course in general psychology.

-xi-

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How Psychology Applies to Everyday Life
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xii
  • Authors’ Welcome xiii
  • Part One - Sex, Booze, and Other Fun Things 1
  • Part Two - Raising the Little Ones 21
  • Part Three - Cops, Robbers, and Forensics 49
  • Part Four - Memory and Intelligence 65
  • Part Five - Anxiety, Stress, and Staying Cool 81
  • Part Six - Odds and Ends 109
  • Part Seven - Notes from the Shrink 133
  • Bibliography 149
  • Index 151
  • About the Author 155
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