Childhood Psychological Disorders: Current Controversies

By Alberto M. Bursztyn | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 5
Autism Spectrum Disorders: Current
Thinking on Etiology and Diagnosis

Jeanne Angus


Introduction

Entering the bright and cheery classroom, the principal sees kindergart-
ners working industriously, practicing printing the letter
A. From the back
of the room comes a low rumbling and muttering of words. The teacher
approaches and does not pause before launching into a diatribe beginning
with, “You have to get him out of here before he hurts someone, I mean re-
ally hurts someone! I don’t know why they even think he should be here,
he doesn’t belong!” Away from the children focused on the letter
A is a
pleasant-appearing boy, fully engaged with his multilevel Lego castle sit-
ting atop an intricately detailed treasure map he has made. He is actively
immersed in some audible monologue and seems totally content until a peer
comes up to join him and is abruptly pushed to the ground. “No dragons in
my kingdom!” he shouts
.

“There’s really nothing wrong with my son; he can do all those things at
home once I show him. His teacher just doesn’t understand him. He’s really
like every other kid; it’s just that he’s special. You should see how quickly
he can find his way on the subway; he knows all the routes and stops. We
never had to teach him. Ask him some facts about hurricanes or when and
where the presidents were born. He can even tell you what day of the week
you were born, and he’ll always remember your birthday. He learned to
do that on his own. But he does have a hard time staying in his seat and
doing what the class is doing. He’s not interested in what they are doing.
He says he’s bored and doesn’t want to have to do the same old things over
and over.”

-71-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Childhood Psychological Disorders: Current Controversies
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 206

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.