The Russian Revolution, 1917-1945

By Anthony D’Agostino | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 7
From Lenin to Stalin, 1921–1928

The regime of revolutionary Russia that emerged after the Bolshevik victory in the civil war was a kind of paradox. On the one hand it was a new world, a place where the most extreme ideas of nineteenth-century socialism were presumably to have a living experiment. On the other, it was a world that its creators saw as impossible. They could not have been Marxists if they truly believed that a backward country could leap into socialism without a more or less drawn-out interval of capitalism. Russian Marxists had lived with this paradox since the suggestion of Marx, in his letter to Vera Zasulich of 1881, that the impossible would indeed be possible if a Russian revolution were accompanied by a genuinely proletarian revolution in an advanced capitalist country, presumably Germany. Soviet Russia was not to be the land around which the world revolution would be organized. It had merely acted as a trigger for a much larger project that, once it got under way, would subordinate Russia to a more advanced country that would become the real leader of the socialist revolution. When the Russian Communists organized the Communist international in 1919, they conducted its sessions in German, in anticipation of the salvation of their desperate 1917 revolt against war. In the meantime, they had to build the institutions of worker-peasant Russia, which the German industrialist and politician Walter Rathenau characterized pityingly as a “rigidly oligarchic agrarian republic.”

At the same time, the Bolsheviks set out to reorganize the vast Russian empire. A federal structure began to take shape immediately under the guiding hand of Stalin, the party’s nationalities expert. He was committed to maintaining a core of Russian primacy among the

-59-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Russian Revolution, 1917-1945
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 173

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.