The Russian Revolution, 1917-1945

By Anthony D’Agostino | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 9
Collectivization of Agriculture
and Five-Year Plan, 1929–1933

In 1928 the party, led by Stalin and his Politburo group, took the fateful step of abandoning the NEP and initiating the collectivization of agriculture, to be accompanied by the adoption of a five-year plan, the first of many. In the view of the Stalin leadership, socialism and planned economy were no longer prohibited by the economic conditions prevailing in a predominantly peasant country. Possessing the state power, Stalin resolved to use it to industrialize the nation at the expense of peasant.

One can say that this was always the implicit intention of the most radical voices in the party, especially the left critics of the StalinBukharin bloc, although most of them shrunk from the prospect. One could also say that Lenin himself, who had urged cooperation with the peasants, also feared that small proprietorship impinged on the proletarian dictatorship in small ways, persistently and in increasing proportions. Stalin was himself probably looking for a way to force things into a large-scale campaign that he could lead to get free of the Bukharin group and to eclipse the others with whom he had been forced to work as an equal in the collective leadership. The decisions were already indicated in 1927 but the leap into the abyss was forced in January 1928 when it was discovered that grain deliveries were two million tons short of that thought to be necessary to feed the workers in the cities. The peasants had staged a “grain strike.”

The Great Turn was the last link in a chain of events in which the Russian revolution came up against international resistance in its attempt to kindle a world revolution. The chain might extend back

-83-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Russian Revolution, 1917-1945
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 173

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.