Islamic Fundamentalism: An Introduction

By Lawrence Davidson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 2
The Society of the
Muslim Brothers

The conditions that gave rise to Islamic fundamentalism were most pronounced in the Muslim lands that, in the nineteenth century, came under direct Western imperial control. In those places, Western and Islamic culture directly clashed, and the Muslim sense of vulnerability was most acute. A good example of this can be found in Egypt, the most populous nation in the Middle East, where people had long seen themselves as the cultural and religious leaders of the Muslim world. It is in Egypt that we find al-Azhar University, the oldest and most famous Islamic institution of higher learning. Coming under British occupation in 1882, Egypt gave rise to the Islamic Modernists in the late nineteenth century. In the early twentieth century it produced the Society of the Muslim Brothers—the first modern politically, culturally, and socially oriented Islamic fundamentalist organization. The society is still in existence today, and one of its members, Mohammed Morsi, became Egypt’s first democratically elected president in 2012. Thus, the Society of the Muslim Brothers stands as an inspiration for Islamic activists throughout the Muslim world.

In the first half of the twentieth century, Egypt suffered from many of the problems that beset the Muslim world. The country remained subject to British imperial control. From behind the scenes, a British high commissioner set the parameters of official action for Egypt’s constitutional monarchy. With imperial control came a quickening of the ongoing westernization of major institutions. Civil law, for example, increasingly displaced Shariah or Muslim religious law, and

-17-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Islamic Fundamentalism: An Introduction
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 215

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.