Reproductive Rights and the State: Getting the Birth Control, RU-486, Morning-after Pills and the Gardasil Vaccine to the U.S. Market

By Melissa Haussman | Go to book overview

8
Conclusion: Why a Feminist
Historical Institutionalist
Lens Is Important

There are many types of institutionalist theories, scrutinized from a feminist lens, that have helped provide an understanding of the evolution of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) from 1930 onward and its relationship to the world’s most profitable system of pharmas. Some noninstitutionalist studies have been helpful as well. This book was bookended by two strange case studies. The first concerning the Pill discussed pharma’s reticence to get behind the first prescription medicine taken long term by healthy women. The last concerning Gardasil highlighted the oddities in the process surrounding FDA approval and Merck’s marketing of the first anti-cancer vaccine. Some of the oddities in the Gardasil approvals and marketing pipeline included Merck’s co-optation of a group claiming to represent women state legislators and anti-cancer groups formed by women. Another set of strange events was seen in the actions of purportedly social conservative Texas governor Rick Perry, willing to mandate Gardasil’s usage, and Medicaid funding for it. In between, the two case studies of RU-486 (mifepristone) and the morning-after pill, first the combination pill Preven and then the levonorgestrel-only Plan B yielded evidence as to how women’s interests fared during the second policy period on U.S. women’s reproductive drug policymaking. It has been shown that social conservative and companies’ financial interests can line up along the same oppositional side of an

-159-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Reproductive Rights and the State: Getting the Birth Control, RU-486, Morning-after Pills and the Gardasil Vaccine to the U.S. Market
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 185

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.