Handbook of Interpersonal Psychology: Theory, Research, Assessment and Therapeutic Interventions

By Leonard M. Horowitz; Stephen Strack | Go to book overview

15
DIFFERENTIATING THE
DARK TRIAD WITHIN THE
INTERPERSONAL CIRCUMPLEX

Daniel N. Jones

Delroy L. Paulhus


INTRODUCTION

The Dark Triad of personality consists of three conceptually distinct, but empirically overlapping constructs: Machiavellianism, narcissism, and psychopathy (Paulhus & Williams, 2002). Psychopathy is a personality trait characterized by callousness, impulsive thrill-seeking, and criminal behavior. Narcissism, on the other hand, is associated with grandiosity, egocentrism, and a sense of personal entitlement. Machiavellianism is marked by strategic manipulation. Although conceptually distinct, all three project onto Quadrant 2 of the interpersonal circumplex. In this chapter, we investigate which aspects of the dark personalities can be captured within interpersonal space and which cannot. We conclude that additional moderating variables are necessary to elucidate the distinctive behavioral style of the Dark Triad members.

To begin, we examine and then refute the notion that these three personalities are the same construct. Our refutation draws on a review of recent empirical evidence showing key differences. To determine the fundamental roots of these differences, we return to the seminal theorists of each construct and uncover two systematic moderators: temporal orientation and identity need. We go on to discuss in detail several new studies supporting the efficacy of these two moderators for differentiating the Dark Triad. We conclude with an attempt to integrate the two moderators within interpersonal theory.

If successful, this approach will permit us to predict the distinct behavioral patterns of the Dark Triad without losing sight of their overlapping nature. At a broader level, we seek to articulate what it may mean for personality variables to share similar interpersonal space while displaying different behavioral manifestations.


UNIFICATIONIST THEORIES

Not all researchers agree that it is worthwhile to discriminate the Dark Triad. Evidence for that unificationist position can be organized into three sources: circumplex research, trait research, and evolutionary arguments. In each of the three subsections below, we provide the strongest case for the unificationist position.

-247-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Handbook of Interpersonal Psychology: Theory, Research, Assessment and Therapeutic Interventions
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 652

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.