Handbook of Interpersonal Psychology: Theory, Research, Assessment and Therapeutic Interventions

By Leonard M. Horowitz; Stephen Strack | Go to book overview

21
INTERVIEW MEASURES OF
INTERPERSONAL FUNCTIONING AND
QUALITY OF OBJECT RELATIONS

Henning Schauenburg

Tilman Grande1


INTRODUCTION

Firmly established maladaptive interpersonal relationship patterns constitute a central cause of mental illness; those relationship patterns may also sustain mental illness (Strupp & Binder, 1984). Over the course of life, “automatic” relationship patterns (which take on a life of their own) develop from the “deposits” of earlier relationship experiences. Such inner-psychic affective-cognitive schemas are continually confirmed and modified in the process of transacting with other people. These schemas are, to a certain extent, observable and measurable (Anchin & Kiesler, 1982).

The assessment of such object-relation patterns using clinical interviews has a long tradition. A review of the literature reveals two types of instruments. The first of these aims to assess dysfunctional relationship patterns based on repetitive figures in interactions between the patient and his or her objects. This involves, for example, evaluating the desires and expectations of the patient, his or her manifest behavior towards others, the response of the object, and the patient’s reaction to this response. This way of “diagnosing a relationship” is generally strongly individualized: The elements can be very specifically determined in each individual case, leading to a wide range of different configurations when the elements are combined. Well-established examples of such approaches include the method of the Core Conflictual Relationship Theme (CCRT) developed by Luborsky and colleagues (Luborsky, 1990a), the Cyclic Maladaptive Pattern (CMP) developed by Strupp & Binder (1991), the RoleRelationship Model Configurations proposed by Horowitz (RRMC; Horowitz, 1991), and the Structural Analysis of Social Behavior (SASB) developed by Benjamin (1974, 1979, 1993; see Chapter 20 in this volume).

Among other benefits, the advantage of such approaches lies in the specificity of the resulting relationship formulations, which often provide a convincing clinical picture and can be used to focus on interpersonal processes in the therapeutic work with the patient. There are additional efforts to identify disorder-specific or group-specific relationship patterns based on empirical findings (e.g., Chance, Bakeman, Kaslow,

-341-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Handbook of Interpersonal Psychology: Theory, Research, Assessment and Therapeutic Interventions
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 652

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.