Handbook of Interpersonal Psychology: Theory, Research, Assessment and Therapeutic Interventions

By Leonard M. Horowitz; Stephen Strack | Go to book overview

33
GROUP THERAPIES

William E. Piper

John S. Ogrodniczuk

This chapter addresses the important role that interpersonal processes play in the successful functioning of group therapy and in the achievement of favorable outcome in group therapy. Group therapy is a form of psychosocial treatment that is customarily conducted by one or two therapists in conjunction with three or more patients (also commonly referred to as clients). Under the guidance of the therapist, who follows a particular theoretical and technical approach, the members of the group communicate and interact with each other in ways specified by the theoretical orientation that are believed to be therapeutic. Interpersonal processes may serve to specify the nature of the patient’s presenting complaints and problems (e.g., chronic relationship difficulties), the etiology of the problem (e.g., parental abuse), the nature of the treatment (e.g., interpersonal group therapy), and the evidence of success (e.g., mutual improvement in one’s partner relationship). Over time, each member of the group establishes a unique relationship with each of the other members of the group. These relationships are usually quite revealing in regard to how the patient perceives and interacts with others and the nature of the patient’s problems. By definition, group therapy is inherently interpersonal.

Most historians attribute the origins of the group therapies to the work of Joseph Pratt (1922), a Boston physician, who used inspirational and psycho-educational techniques with groups of tuberculosis patients. As Scheidlinger (1993) pointed out in a chapter on the history of group therapy, the refinement of the group therapies as a treatment technique was largely an American phenomenon. Many were derivatives of psychoanalytic theory and technique, while others developed more independently. An example of the latter was the work of military psychiatrists in England, who were forced to use group therapy with large numbers of military personnel. Development of various group techniques in mid-century reflected the rivalry between Jacob Moreno, who founded psychodrama, and Samuel Slavson, who founded activity therapy.


UNSTRUCTURED TIME AS A
DIFFERENTIATOR OF GROUP
THERAPIES

The degree to which group therapy models permit unstructured time during therapy sessions reflects the extent to which the models make use of interpersonal processes

-563-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Handbook of Interpersonal Psychology: Theory, Research, Assessment and Therapeutic Interventions
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 652

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.