Harriet Beecher Stowe: The Story of Her Life

By Charles Edward Stowe; Lyman Beecher Stowe | Go to book overview

HARRIET BEECHER STOWE THE STORY OF HER LIFE

CHAPTER I
HOW THE CHILD GREW

MOST of us have some recollections of early childhood which stand out in our minds as vividly as the most important events of later life. Harriet Beecher's earliest recollections were of her mother, who died September 25, 1816, when Harriet was five years old. She says of her mother, in describing the first of these incidents, "Mother was an enthusiastic horticulturist in all small ways that her limited means allowed. Her brother John, in New York, had just sent her a small parcel of fine tulipbulbs. I remember rummaging these out of an obscure corner of the nursery one day when she was gone out, and being strongly seized with the idea that they were good to eat, and using all the little English I then possessed to persuade my brothers that these were onions such as grown people ate, and would be very nice for us. So we fell to and devoured the whole, and I recollect being some-

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Harriet Beecher Stowe: The Story of Her Life
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations x
  • Chapter I - How the Child Grew 1
  • Chapter II - On the Threshold 38
  • Chapter III - Teacher and Writer 66
  • Chapter IV - Wife and Mother 95
  • Chapter V - How "Uncle Tom's Cabin" Was Built 124
  • Chapter VI - From Obscurity to Fame 158
  • Chapter VII - Through Smoke of Battle 186
  • Chapter VIII - Life in the South 217
  • Chapter IX - Delineator of New England Life and Character 242
  • Chapter X - The Ebbing Tide 274
  • Index 303
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 316

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.