How Globalization Spurs Terrorism: The Lopsided Benefits of "One World" and Why That Fuels Violence

By Fathali M. Moghaddam | Go to book overview

support dictatorships in Saudi Arabia, Pakistan, Egypt, and elsewhere in the Near and Middle East. Bush did not create the new global American dilemma, but he brought it to the boil.

The threat of terrorism might serve as a means by which to divert attention away from the new global American dilemma, in part because terrorism seems to demand immediate reactions from U.S. authorities. Of course, it is natural that our immediate reactions to the threat of terrorism have been short term, often very short term—a matter of only days and weeks. Each terrorist threat or actual attack has been followed by frenzied activities on the part of counterterrorist agencies and multiple national and international organizations, focused on trying to deal with the immediate threat, by capturing or destroying the attackers. The media spotlight and the attention of politicians put pressure on everyone involved in counterterrorism to show immediate results. Too often, our understanding of terrorism is shaped by one frantic media event after another, all focused on short-term goals.

While it is imperative and that we have strong short-term counterterrorism strategies that work, and that we “take out” terrorists and foil their plots on a day-to-day basis, it is even more essential that we develop effective long-term policies to end terrorism. In order for such policies to emerge, we must first come to better understand the relationship between terrorism and globalization, “the accelerated integration of capital, production and markets.”3 Such an understanding will enable us to discover the deeper roots of terrorism.

My focus is on terrorism arising from Islamic communities in nonWestern and Western societies. This is not because other kinds of terrorism have ended, but because for the next few decades the greatest international threat will remain that of terrorism perpetrated by Islamic fanatics. The rapid growth of Muslim communities in western societies makes this threat more urgent and complicated, in part because it seems so unlikely—as unlikely as specialist medical doctors, who are sworn to protect life, launching terrorist attacks intended to kill civilians, as happened in the United Kingdom in July 2007.

But the so-called “war on terror” will only serve as a short-term distraction from the new global American dilemma. Inevitably, the contradictions between American rhetoric and practices, rhetorical support for democracy and practical support for dictatorships, are bringing into focus the new global American dilemma. How successfully this challenge is tackled has the greatest implications not only for the United States, but also for all humankind.

-x-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
How Globalization Spurs Terrorism: The Lopsided Benefits of "One World" and Why That Fuels Violence
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 195

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.