How Globalization Spurs Terrorism: The Lopsided Benefits of "One World" and Why That Fuels Violence

By Fathali M. Moghaddam | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 4
One World: Globalization as Ideal

The worldly hope men set their heart upon
Turns ashes—or it prospers; and anon,
Like snow upon the desert’s dusty face
Lighting up a little hour or two—is gone.

—Omar Khayam (c.1048–c.1122)

“My name is Ozymandias, king of kings:
Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!”
Nothing beside remains. Round the decay
Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare
The lone and level sands stretch far away.

—Percy Shelley (1792–1822)

At the heart of the argument for “one world” is the common human condition, the deep existential experience of each of us being on this earth for only a brief period. Ultimately, we are bound together by our transience, and the anxiety-provoking experience of living always with the knowledge of certain death ahead of us. The old saying that we can only be sure of two things, “death and taxes” needs revision as many multimillionaires manage to escape taxes, but not even the wiliest of accountants that money can buy are able to do creative accounting tricks that cheat death. Again and again, the poets remind us of this predicament, telling us that even those who become “king of kings” cannot defy death, and eventually end up returning to “desert sands.” “Mighty leaders” can, for a brief period, warn others to “Look on my

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