War Crimes, Genocide, and the Law: A Guide to the Issues

By Arnold Krammer | Go to book overview

A&M University’s department of political science, is an excellent writer in her own right and is, as in the past, my first line of editorial defense.

All translations from French have been provided by Professor Gérard Chètrit, in Paris, whose fluency in several languages has been enormously helpful.

A major source of modern military information may be found in the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, under the direction of Dr. Conrad C. Crane, where knowledgeable historians like Dr. Richard J. Sommers and Arthur W. Bergeron, Jr., and photo experts like Clif Hyatt, all of whom have spent years immersed in the records, are standing by with keen archival expertise and helpful advice. For the legal side of the issue of war crimes, one can benefit hugely from a visit to the Robert H. Jackson Center, located in the Jamestown, New York, home of the Chief American Prosecutor at the Nuremberg Tribunal and Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. His archives are maintained in a quaint, mid-1800s mansion, adding to the personal touch one receives while reading his correspondence and legal decisions on rights guaranteed to war criminals and definitions of their acts.

A surprisingly beneficial source of information appeared in a small county public library in West Virginia. The Brooke County Public Library, in Wellsburg, West Virginia, a local cultural center hard on the banks of the Ohio River, happens to hold an impressive collection of documents related to the Japanese bombardment of Corregidor and the Bataan Death March in the Philippine Campaign during World War Two. Built around the original collection donated by survivor Edward Jackfert, the library is watched over by its very competent director, Mary Kay Wallace, MLS.

Finally, a book of such emotional demands requires a network of friends and family: the endless tolerance of my wife, Jan, whose encyclopedic knowledge and editorial skill have provided answers and corrections at every turn; the irrepressible humor of our son, Adam, in San Francisco; and the sage advice of brother Steven, and his wife, Marleen. When the gloom of man’s horrific acts settles over us, we cast our attention to our younger son, Douglas, a paramedic saving lives, a calling that offers us hope for the future.

-x-

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