The Words and Music of Jimi Hendrix

By David Moskowitz | Go to book overview

1
The Early Years: Teeth
Cutting and Life as a
Sideman

The guitar legend that the world knew as Jimi Hendrix was born Johnny Allen Hendrix on November 27, 1942. Jimi’s seventeen-year-old mother, Lucille, gave birth to him at Seattle’s King County Hospital at 10:15 A. M. Jimi’s father, James “Al” Hendrix, was not a presence in his young life as he had been drafted, denied leave, and was about to be deployed overseas. Lucille was not at the point of her young life where settling down with a baby was part of the plan. Matters were made worse by her having little money and no stable place to live. Help came in the form of Lucille’s mother, Clarice Jeter. Jimi’s grandmother moved to Seattle to help Lucille raise her young son. Both Clarice and Lucille worked menial jobs to try to make ends meet and support Jimi. The result of this was that Jimi often went without proper care during working hours. Clarice was working as a housekeeper for a family called the Maes.1 The Maes offered to help look after Jimi while Clarice and Lucille were at work. The unfortunate downside of this was that Lucille began leaving Jimi in the care of others while she spent evenings out dancing and spending time with other men, instead of just while she was at work.

An aspect of this association with the Mae family was that Jimi often ended up in the care of their then twelve-year-old daughter, Freddie. In addition to Freddie’s watch, her mother Minnie also looked after young Jimi. In fact, at one point in Jimi’s infancy, he stayed with the Maes as Lucille was missing and her mother could not both work and care for the child full time. This arrangement was in effect off-and-on for much of Jimi’s young life.

Although Lucille was married to Al, Jimi’s father was not in Seattle and Lucille began running around with other men. This was invariably to Jimi’s

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The Words and Music of Jimi Hendrix
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Series Foreword ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction xiii
  • 1- The Early Years- Teeth Cutting and Life as a Sideman 1
  • 2- Overnight Success (1966–1967) 9
  • 3- Taking Control (Fall 1967–1969) 27
  • 4- New Horizons 55
  • 5- The Gypsys- Part II 63
  • 6- The "New" Jimi Hendrix Experience 73
  • 7- Jimi Lives on- Selected Posthumous Albums 85
  • 8 - More and More- The Douglas Releases, Dolly Dagger Records, and More Modern Releases 99
  • 9- The Legacy of Jimi Hendrix- Merchandizing a Legend and Control 125
  • Tours and Jam Sessions 133
  • Selected Discography 155
  • Notes 179
  • Bibliography 197
  • Index 201
  • About the Author 208
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