The Words and Music of Jimi Hendrix

By David Moskowitz | Go to book overview

5
The Gypsys: Part II

After Woodstock, Jimi remained in New York for a time. Some of the rest of the band headed out in opposite directions, but Jimi stayed in Shokan. He was often spotted in and around Woodstock in his flashy Corvette Stingray as it was the only one of its kind in a part of the state largely dedicated to farming. After continuing to rehearse at the Shokan house for about ten days, Jimi decided to move to the Hotel Navarro in New York.1 This came on the heels of a meeting with Jeffery that took place in Shokan during which Jimi was pressed into a gig at the Salvation Club in New York. The club and its scene were known to be mob connected at the time and it was unclear whether Jimi was “muscled” into the gig. What was clear was that Jimi again needed access to a studio so the move into the metropolitan area made sense from a work standpoint.

Back in New York City, Jimi got down to work in the studio. He put down tracks for several new songs at the Hit Factory, including “Message to Love,” “Easy Blues,” “Izabella,” and “Beginning.” By the end of August he also had worked up “Machine Gun,” “Stepping Stone,” and “Mastermind.” As summer dragged into fall, Jimi began to identify more directly with his black roots. Through the run-up to Woodstock, the Black Panthers organization had frequently visited with Jimi and talked with him about being one of the “brothers.” However, Jimi purposefully chose not to identify people by color and instead focused on his music. He had been gaining a greater affinity for those who were less fortunate and had direct experience with the urban black underclass in New York City. To that end, Jimi signed on to play a concert to benefit the United Block Association.2

-63-

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The Words and Music of Jimi Hendrix
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Series Foreword ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction xiii
  • 1- The Early Years- Teeth Cutting and Life as a Sideman 1
  • 2- Overnight Success (1966–1967) 9
  • 3- Taking Control (Fall 1967–1969) 27
  • 4- New Horizons 55
  • 5- The Gypsys- Part II 63
  • 6- The "New" Jimi Hendrix Experience 73
  • 7- Jimi Lives on- Selected Posthumous Albums 85
  • 8 - More and More- The Douglas Releases, Dolly Dagger Records, and More Modern Releases 99
  • 9- The Legacy of Jimi Hendrix- Merchandizing a Legend and Control 125
  • Tours and Jam Sessions 133
  • Selected Discography 155
  • Notes 179
  • Bibliography 197
  • Index 201
  • About the Author 208
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