The Words and Music of Jimi Hendrix

By David Moskowitz | Go to book overview

8
More and More: The
Douglas Releases, Dolly
Dagger Records, and More
Modern Releases

DOUGLAS RELEASES

The labyrinth of Jimi’s posthumous releases continued unabated in the wake of Jeffery’s death. With Jeffery and Kramer out of the picture (Jeffery permanently and Kramer temporarily), the road was cleared for Alan Douglas to step back into the light. The material that Douglas had of Jimi’s was little more than “jams, demos, and scraps.”1 That said, Douglas dove headlong into the idea of releasing “new” Jimi albums in any way that he could. His efforts to reshape Jimi’s music were mindboggling to many at the time. Douglas’ reworking of Jimi’s music was so heavy handed that he actually replaced original parts with overdubs done by studio musicians years after the fact. With that in mind, the Douglas material cannot be considered as original Jimi music, but still must be accounted for in some way. The truly unexplainable aspect of all of the Douglas work was his steadfast assertion that he somehow had a clearer picture of Jimi’s intent than Jimi himself did. Regardless of Douglas’ intent, the material that he issued under Jimi’s name was overdubbed, remixed, and remastered in a very heavy-handed manner.


CRASH LANDING

The first record that Douglas put out as a Jimi Hendrix album was called Crash Landing. The record surfaced in 1975 and was billed as containing previously unreleased material. Unlike the other Douglas releases, Crash Landing actually did quite well. For a compilation of overdubbed songs by an artist who had been dead for five years, the fact that the album made it

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The Words and Music of Jimi Hendrix
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Series Foreword ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction xiii
  • 1- The Early Years- Teeth Cutting and Life as a Sideman 1
  • 2- Overnight Success (1966–1967) 9
  • 3- Taking Control (Fall 1967–1969) 27
  • 4- New Horizons 55
  • 5- The Gypsys- Part II 63
  • 6- The "New" Jimi Hendrix Experience 73
  • 7- Jimi Lives on- Selected Posthumous Albums 85
  • 8 - More and More- The Douglas Releases, Dolly Dagger Records, and More Modern Releases 99
  • 9- The Legacy of Jimi Hendrix- Merchandizing a Legend and Control 125
  • Tours and Jam Sessions 133
  • Selected Discography 155
  • Notes 179
  • Bibliography 197
  • Index 201
  • About the Author 208
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