The Words and Music of Paul McCartney: The Solo Years

By Vincent P. Benitez | Go to book overview

6
Renewal, 2000–2007

DRIVING RAIN (2001)

After releasing Run Devil Run in 1999, and restlessly creative, McCartney decided to record another album. After mourning the death of his beloved wife, Linda Eastman, he once again turned to music as therapy, releasing new, pent-up energies that generated a flood of high-caliber songs. As evidenced by a steady change in opinion dating back to Flowers in the Dirt in which Elvis Costello encouraged him to celebrate his past as a Beatle, McCartney approached this new project, along with the later Chaos and Creation in the Backyard (2005) and Memory Almost Full (2007), with a new-found sense of liberation and self. He could do what he wanted to do, incorporating different styles into his music, even if that meant embracing his past as a Beatle, something that he had tried to avoid since his days with Wings. In short, at almost 60 years old, McCartney was starting over.

McCartney began recording what was to become Driving Rain at Henson Studios in Los Angeles between March and July 2001.1 For this project he assembled a new band, from which two members would continue to record and tour with him during the next several years: Rusty Anderson, guitar; Gabe Dixon, keyboards; and Abe Laboriel, Jr., drums. McCartney co-produced the album with David Kahne, who had worked with a whole range of people from Tony Bennett to the Bangles. As with his work on Run Devil Run, McCartney wanted a Beatles-style approach to recording while making Driving Rain in order to capture a freshness and spontaneity not possible with a perfectionist mindset. Accordingly, he recorded the album in two weeks, by first

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The Words and Music of Paul McCartney: The Solo Years
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Series Foreword ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction- a Biographical Sketch of Paul McCartney 1
  • 1 - The Remaking of a Beatle- Paul McCartney as Solo Artist, 1970–71 19
  • 2 - Paul McCartney and Wings, 1971–74 37
  • 3 - Paul McCartney and Wings, 1975–80 61
  • 4 - Collaborating with Others, 1980–89 99
  • 5 - Classical Music, Beatles Reunion, and Musical Roots, 1991–99 133
  • 6 - Renewal, 2000–2007 155
  • 7 - Popular Music Icon 171
  • Glossary of Technical Terms 173
  • Selected Discography/Videography 179
  • Notes 183
  • Selected Bibliography 195
  • Index 201
  • About the Author 209
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