Environmental Security: A Guide to the Issues

By Elizabeth L. Chalecki | Go to book overview

APPENDIX I
Biographies

Since environmental security is such a wide-ranging and transdisciplinary field, there are many people who have contributed to its development, both as an academic theory and as an operational concern. Consequently, I have included biographical profiles of six people and three organizations which represent the various facets of environmental security, from food to weapons to population to ecosystem integrity. There are many other worthy academic thinkers and organizations that do excellent work in the environmental security field, but they could not be included here due to space constraints.


Africom, U.S. Department of Defense Combatant Command

AFRICOM is the U.S. Africa Command, one of six regional combatant commands within the U.S. Department of Defense. AFRICOM’s area of responsibility (AOR) includes the entire African continent (excepting Egypt, which remains under the AOR of CENTCOM). Officially declared on October 1, 2008, and headquartered in Stuttgart, Germany, its mission, in concert with other U.S. government agencies and international partners, is to conduct sustained security engagement through military-to-military programs, militarysponsored activities, and other military operations as directed to promote a stable and secure African environment in support of U.S. foreign policy. General Carter F. Ham is the commanding officer.

The AOR for AFRICOM was transferred from three different combatant commands: most of the African continent was transferred from the European command, Sudan and the Horn of Africa from Central Command, and Madagascar and the surrounding islands from Pacific Command. First proposed as early as 2000, a unified command for Africa seemed to be prudent

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