Sacred Terror: How Faith Becomes Lethal

By Daniel E. Price | Go to book overview

Introduction

September 11, 2001, was a rude awakening for Americans to the problem of religion-based terrorism. Although religion-based terrorism is as old as organized religion and the current wave of religion -based terrorism began in the 1970s, the attacks on the World Trade Center, the Pentagon, and the attempted attack on either the U.S. Capitol or the White House was the first significant, successful incident of religious terrorism on American soil.1

Since then, religion-based terrorism, particularly Islamic extremism, has been labeled as the most significant threat to both U.S. and global security. In the United States, the 9/11 attacks were used as justification for launching wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, and the USA Patriot Act was quickly passed, which significantly enhanced the government’s power to collect information on both citizens and noncitizens and weakened the protection of civil liberties. New government bureaucracies including the Department of Homeland Security and the Transportation Security Administration were created in order to protect Americans from this new threat. Also, a now discontinued color-coded terror alert system to warn Americans of the likelihood of a terrorist attack was instituted. Students across the country flocked to enroll in courses in Arabic language, Middle East Studies, and Islamic studies. The new threat to American and world safety, religious extremism, had been identified, and a campaign was launched to defeat the enemy.

The threat became clearer when we became more familiar with al Qaeda, the Islamic extremist organization headed by Osama bin Laden. Al Qaeda appeared to be particularly menacing because of its stated goal of replacing the current world order with a global Islamic nation ruled by Islamic law;

-xv-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Sacred Terror: How Faith Becomes Lethal
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 269

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.