CliffsNotes on Franklin's Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin

By Merrill Maguire Skaggs | Go to book overview

Section 18

Summary

Franklin’s first step as Assembly Agent was to visit Dr. Fothergill, who advised him to approach the Pennsylvania Proprietors before complaining about them to the government. A Virginia merchant introduced Franklin to Lord Granville, President of the King’s Council, who informed him that the King’s instructions to the governors became the colonists’ laws. Alarmed at this line of thought, Franklin argued that the right to originate their own laws in their Assemblies was guaranteed to the colonists by the province charter; the King could veto proposed laws, but could neither repeal nor alter a law once his original approval had been given.

Fothergill arranged a meeting between Franklin and the Proprietors which began amiably, with everyone present declaring his desire to be reasonable. But after Franklin had presented the Assembly’s complaints, and the Proprietors had answered such charges, Franklin felt there was no hope of agreement. He promised, however, to write down his complaints, so that they could be considered at length. The papers were then given to the firm’s solicitor, Ferdinando John Paris, “a proud angry Man” who disliked Franklin personally because of Franklin’s answers, written on behalf of the Assembly, to his official letters. Franklin therefore refused to discuss matters with Paris, or to talk with anyone but the Proprietors. Then the firm asked opinions on Franklin’s paper from the Attorney General and the Solicitor General, who both delayed answering for a year.

A year later, the Proprietors sent word to the Assembly that they wanted to talk with “some Person of Candour” instead of Franklin, who had insulted them by the informal style in which he wrote down the complaints. But the Assembly ignored this request. It had persuaded Governor Denny to pass a law taxing the Proprietary estates along with others. The Proprietors tried to prevent the King from giving his assent to this tax law, alleging that their estates would be taxed unjustly. But at the hearing, Franklin officially promised that measures would be taken to prevent such injustice. Franklin also argued that paper money based on the assumed validity of this tax bill had already been distributed, and that revoking the tax would disrupt the provincial economy. So the law was allowed to pass, though the Proprietors turned Governor Denny, who had originally signed the law as their representative, out of office.


Analysis

Franklin ends his Autobiography with a description of his successful stand against the Proprietors.

-41-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
CliffsNotes on Franklin's Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Table of Contents 1
  • Book Summary 2
  • About the Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin 3
  • Character List 8
  • Summary and Analysis 10
  • Section 1 11
  • Section 2 12
  • Section 3 14
  • Section 4 16
  • Section 5 18
  • Section 6 20
  • Section 7 22
  • Section 8 24
  • Section 9 25
  • Section 10 27
  • Section 11 29
  • Section 12 31
  • Section 13 33
  • Section 14 35
  • Section 15 36
  • Section 16 38
  • Section 17 40
  • Section 18 41
  • Critical Essays 42
  • Franklin’s Writing Style 43
  • Franklin’s Humor 44
  • Franklin and the American Dream 45
  • Franklin and the Spirit of Capitalism 46
  • Critical Opinions of the Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin 47
  • Study Help 49
  • Quiz 50
  • Essay Questions 51
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 51

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.