CliffsNotes on Brontë's Wuthering Heights

By Richard P. Wasowski | Go to book overview

Chapter 27

Summary

During the week that follows, Edgar’s health continues to deteriorate, so it is grudgingly that Cathy rides to meet Linton. During the visit, Heathcliff arrives and demands to know if Edgar is truly dying. Heathcliff is worried that Linton might die before Edgar does.

Heathcliff asks Cathy to walk her cousin back to Wuthering Heights. Although she meekly reminds Heathcliff that she is forbidden from visiting the farmhouse, Cathy disobeys her father’s instructions. Linton’s cries of anguish and Heathcliff’s rage, which is directed toward Linton, however, convince both Cathy and Nelly to accompany them.

After they’re inside, Heathcliff imprisons Cathy and Nelly; he will not release her until after she and Linton are married. Overnight, Heathcliff locks Cathy in a bedroom. In the morning he frees Cathy from the room, but Nelly is held prisoner for five days, only seeing Hareton, who serves as her jailer.


Analysis

Linton is extremely pathetic and obviously terrified of Heathcliff; however, the manner in which he speaks to Cathy after she is lured to Wuthering Heights mitigates any sympathy readers may be feeling for him.

After Cathy is locked inside, Linton reveals to her Heathcliff’s plans, and a sense of inescapable doom exists. This kidnapping, the first time Heathcliff does something entirely outside the limits of the law, is an act of desperation on his behalf; Linton needs to marry Cathy before Edgar’s death, and Edgar needs to die before Linton does in order for Heathcliff to solidify his claim on Thrushcross Grange. Heathcliff’s actions clearly illustrate the philosophy that “the ends justify the means.” In doing so, readers tend to root for Cathy to be able to somehow thwart Heathcliff’s growing power. Nelly does not witness the wedding, but Cathy and Linton do indeed get married.


Glossary

enigmatical perplexing or baffling.

magnamity the ability to rise above pettiness or meanness.

ling heather.

vivisection medical research consisting of surgical operations or other experiments performed on living animals to study the structure and function of living organs and parts.

cockatrice deadly serpent in myth or the Bible.

-43-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
CliffsNotes on Brontë's Wuthering Heights
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Table of Contents 1
  • Wuthering Heights at a Glance 2
  • Book Summary 4
  • About Wuthering Heights 5
  • Character List 7
  • Summary and Analysis 8
  • Chapter 1 9
  • Chapter 2 11
  • Chapter 3 13
  • Chapter 4 15
  • Chapter 5 17
  • Chapter 6 18
  • Chapter 7 20
  • Chapter 8 21
  • Chapter 9 22
  • Chapter 10 23
  • Chapter 11 24
  • Chapter 12 25
  • Chapter 13 26
  • Chapter 14 27
  • Chapter 15 28
  • Chapter 16 29
  • Chapter 17 30
  • Chapter 18 32
  • Chapter 19 34
  • Chapter 20 35
  • Chapter 21 36
  • Chapter 22 38
  • Chapter 23 39
  • Chapter 24 40
  • Chapter 25 41
  • Chapter 26 42
  • Chapter 27 43
  • Chapter 28 44
  • Chapter 29 45
  • Chapter 30 46
  • Chapter 31 47
  • Chapter 32 48
  • Chapter 33 49
  • Chapter 34 50
  • Character Analysis 51
  • Heathcliff 52
  • Catherine Earnshaw 53
  • Edgar Linton 54
  • Cathy Linton 55
  • Hareton Earnshaw 56
  • Ellen (Nelly) Dean 57
  • Character Genealogy 58
  • Emily Brontë Biography 59
  • Critical Essays 61
  • Major Themes 62
  • The Narrative Structure 63
  • Class Structure 64
  • Heathcliff’s Obsession 65
  • Study Help 66
  • Full Glossary 67
  • Essay Questions 75
  • Practice Project 76
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 76

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.