CliffsNotes on Brontë's Wuthering Heights

By Richard P. Wasowski | Go to book overview

Chapter 32

Summary

Six months later, Lockwood is in the area and returns to the Grange, only to find that Nelly is now living at Wuthering Heights. He travels there, and Nelly tells him what has happened since Lockwood left.

Two weeks after Lockwood departed from the Grange, Nelly was summoned to Wuthering Heights to be Cathy’s companion because Zillah has left. While Nelly is there, Cathy admits to her that she was wrong to have made fun of Hareton, Hareton avoids Cathy, and Heathcliff withdraws from everyone.

After Hareton accidentally shoots himself and has to stay inside, he and Cathy argue but eventually make up and agree to be cousins. As a peace offering, Cathy wraps up a book and has Nelly present it to Hareton. If he accepts the book, Cathy will teach him to read and vows never to tease him again.


Analysis

A date, 1802, opens this chapter, calling to mind the first chapter and indicating the passage of time from whence Lockwood initially began his diary. As Lockwood returns to the area, he notices the disparity between the moors in winter and summer. Once again, the idea of a contrasting yet dual nature comes through. Wuthering Heights is based on contrasts, and as the novel nears its end, themes that were previously shown but not told are now being spoken of directly.

When Lockwood arrives at Wuthering Heights, he does not encounter a lock — the first sign that a change has taken place. The fragrance of flowers and fruit is the second. While Nelly mentions that Heathcliff has been dead for three months, she backs up in time to provide the details of the narrative that occurred between the time Lockwood left and his subsequent return.

In this chapter, forgiveness occurs for the first time. In a scene reminiscent of Catherine’s death, Cathy begs forgiveness. This time, it is Hareton, not Heathcliff, who must decide, and he forgives her. With Cathy and Hareton becoming allies, the second generation is not doomed to repeat the mistakes of the first. All that needs to fall into place is the death of Heathcliff.


Glossary

hostler a person who takes care of horses at an inn or stable.

glens narrow, secluded valleys.

heath a tract of open wasteland, especially in the British Isles, covered with heather and low shrubs; moor

fagots bundles of sticks and twigs.

fortnight a period of two weeks.

automatons persons or animals acting in an automatic or mechanical way.

morose ill-tempered, gloomy, or sullen.

beguiling passing (time) pleasantly.

obdurate stubborn.

-48-

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CliffsNotes on Brontë's Wuthering Heights
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Table of Contents 1
  • Wuthering Heights at a Glance 2
  • Book Summary 4
  • About Wuthering Heights 5
  • Character List 7
  • Summary and Analysis 8
  • Chapter 1 9
  • Chapter 2 11
  • Chapter 3 13
  • Chapter 4 15
  • Chapter 5 17
  • Chapter 6 18
  • Chapter 7 20
  • Chapter 8 21
  • Chapter 9 22
  • Chapter 10 23
  • Chapter 11 24
  • Chapter 12 25
  • Chapter 13 26
  • Chapter 14 27
  • Chapter 15 28
  • Chapter 16 29
  • Chapter 17 30
  • Chapter 18 32
  • Chapter 19 34
  • Chapter 20 35
  • Chapter 21 36
  • Chapter 22 38
  • Chapter 23 39
  • Chapter 24 40
  • Chapter 25 41
  • Chapter 26 42
  • Chapter 27 43
  • Chapter 28 44
  • Chapter 29 45
  • Chapter 30 46
  • Chapter 31 47
  • Chapter 32 48
  • Chapter 33 49
  • Chapter 34 50
  • Character Analysis 51
  • Heathcliff 52
  • Catherine Earnshaw 53
  • Edgar Linton 54
  • Cathy Linton 55
  • Hareton Earnshaw 56
  • Ellen (Nelly) Dean 57
  • Character Genealogy 58
  • Emily Brontë Biography 59
  • Critical Essays 61
  • Major Themes 62
  • The Narrative Structure 63
  • Class Structure 64
  • Heathcliff’s Obsession 65
  • Study Help 66
  • Full Glossary 67
  • Essay Questions 75
  • Practice Project 76
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