Rich and Poor in America: A Reference Handbook

By Geoffrey Gilbert | Go to book overview

Glossary

asset-building A policy area that focuses on strategies for helping lowincome families and individuals build up their financial assets.

assortative mating A social pattern in which individuals marry others who are similar in significant ways. Some believe the tendency of welleducated, upwardly mobile men to marry women with the same characteristics is contributing to growing economic inequality.

capital gain A form of income rarely received by low-income individuals but often contributing to the income of the wealthy. Such a gain occurs when an asset, for example, a share of stock or a piece of land, is sold at a higher price than was originally paid for it, the rise in value constituting a capital gain. If tax rates on capital gains are lowered, as happened in 2003, it is considered a favorable change for the rich.

conservative A political-philosophical position according to which the wide and growing gap between incomes of the rich and poor is a normal, cyclical expression of the capitalist economy. The conservative policy position on the rich-poor gap would be to let it play itself out, without government intervention.

conspicuous consumption A term coined by American economist Thorstein Veblen (1857–1929) to describe showy displays of one’s wealth in order to impress others. Such displays are often cited by those critical of the current gap between rich and poor.

decile One-tenth of the whole; the share of income going to the top decile is sometimes contrasted with the share going to the bottom decile.

estate tax A tax levied on the accumulated assets of an individual at the time of his/her death and payable by the individual’s heirs or beneficiaries. The first $2 million of the estate is exempt from the federal estate tax in 2008; on amounts in excess of $2 million, the tax rate ranges from 18 percent at the low end to 55 percent at the high end, making this one of the most progressive taxes in the country.

Gini coefficient, Gini index The most common yardstick of overall income (or wealth) inequality for a country. A Gini of zero indicates total

-259-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Rich and Poor in America: A Reference Handbook
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents ix
  • Preface xiii
  • 1 - Background and History 1
  • 2 - Problems, Controversies, and Solutions 31
  • 3 - Worldwide Perspective 79
  • 4 - Chronology 107
  • 5 - Biographical Sketches 127
  • 6 - Data and Documents 155
  • 7 - Directory of Organizations 201
  • 8 - Selected Print and Nonprint Resources 227
  • Glossary 259
  • Index 263
  • About the Author 275
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 275

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.