Submarines: An Illustrated History of Their Impact

By Paul E. Fontenoy | Go to book overview

GLOSSARY

Admiralty: Shorthand terminology for the Royal Navy’s Board of Admiralty, which heads its central administration. Unlike most such boards, it includes both the civilian political appointees and the professional heads of the fleet.

Air Lock: A watertight compartment through which a diver may pass between a submarine and the sea, pausing within it while the air pressure is equalized with the external environment.

Ballast Tank: A tank that may be filled or emptied of water to increase or decrease a boat’s displacement.

Ballast Tank, Saddle: Ballast tank mounted outside the main structure of the hull, named by analogy with saddlebags.

Bridge: The ship’s navigating and control station.

Bulge: Structures built onto a ship’s side beyond the primary hull structure. Initially these were used to enhance protection against damage from a torpedo hit but they came to be employed more to enhance stability by increasing a hull’s internal volume.

Casing: A light non-pressure-resistant structure designed to improve submarine performance and/or enhance personnel access on the surface.

Catapult: A device for launching aircraft into the air.

Conseil Superieur: The French Navy’s professional leadership.

Conning Tower: Navigation station outside the main hull.

Convoy: A group of merchant vessels traveling together under escort.

Depth Charge: An explosive charge detonated at a preset depth.

Diving Planes: Horizontal control surfaces used to move a submarine in a vertical plane.

Drop-Collar: A mechanical arrangement suspending a torpedo that may be release remotely.

Dynamite Gun: A gun using compressed air as propellant for its missile, which had a dynamite explosive charge.

General Board: The professional leadership of the United States Navy until 1948.

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Submarines: An Illustrated History of Their Impact
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction to Weapons and Warfare Series vii
  • Preface ix
  • Chapter One - Early Submarines 1
  • Chapter Two - A War-Winning Weapon? 23
  • Chapter Three - The Advent of True Submarines 39
  • Chapter Four - Strategic Missile Submarines 53
  • Submarines of the World 63
  • Pioneers 65
  • Submarine Builders 67
  • Early Submarines 75
  • A War-Winning Weapon? 181
  • The Advent of True Submarines 313
  • Strategic Missile Submarines 401
  • Glossary 425
  • Bibliography 429
  • Websites 437
  • Index 439
  • About the Author 449
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