Going to School in the Middle East and North Africa

By Kwabena Dei Ofori-Attah | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This book is the result of the collective efforts of several people and agencies. Without their help, you might not be reading this book. Some of them may not even be aware that the information they shared and discussed with me about the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) about ten years ago still remains in me like an oasis, never drying up, and springing forth in me as fresh ideas about the region.

One area that intrigues me about the MENA region is the steady progress being made in education. Although the region can boast of being a pioneer in formal schooling, for several decades schooling facilities there fell short of public expectations. However, the discovery of oil has changed the face of education in nearly all the countries that form part of his huge swath of land, the home of great ancient civilizations.

Indeed, I am forever grateful to all of them for helping me gain a greater insight into a region where innovative practices in organized learning, technology, and economic activities in the past have changed educational systems throughout the world today.

I would like to thank Dr. Gifford Doxsee of Ohio University, who first provided me the impetus to undertake this study. As a graduate student at Ohio University, I took several courses with him on the Middle East and North Africa. Each course opened a new avenue for me to understand the history, politics, and social characteristics of the region.

Professor Milton Ploghoft of Ohio University, through my involvement in the activities of the African Educational Research Network, provided me the opportunity to access valuable information for the book.

Of course, I could not have produced this book without the help I received from UNESCO, World Education Services (WES), and the Comparative and International Education Society (CIES). UNESCO provided me with valuable

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