Science Fiction Authors: A Research Guide

By Maura Heaphy | Go to book overview

Author Entries

Douglas Adams (1952–2001)

although it has many omissions, contains much that is apocryphal, or at
least wildly inaccurate, it scores over the older, more pedestrian work in two
important ways. First, it is slightly cheaper, and second it has the words ‘DON’T
PANIC’ inscribed in large, friendly letters on the cover
.

—The Hitch-Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy (1978)


Biography

Douglas Adams’ classic, The Hitch-Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, first appeared as a BBC Radio 4 series in March 1978. It became a series of best-selling novels, a TV series, record album, computer games, several stage adaptations, and a Hollywood movie. The five books in the “Trilogy” have sold over 15 million copies in Britain, the United States, and Australia and was a best seller in many other languages.

Douglas Noel Adams was born in Cambridge, England, and grew up in Middlesex. In addition to The Hitch-Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, he was involved as writer, script editor, and sometimes performer on TV series such as Monty Python’s Flying Circus and Doctor Who. While living in Santa Barbara, California with his wife and young daughter, and working on the screenplay of the long-awaited movie version of H2G2, Adams died on May 11, 2001, suddenly, of a heart attack.

ALIENS;ARTIFICIALINTELLIGENCE;ENDOFTHEWORLD;FANTASTIC VOYAGES; HUMOR AND SATIRE


Major Works

Novels

The Hitch-Hiker’s Guide “Trilogy:”The Hitch-Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy(1979),The Restaurant at the End of the Universe (1980), Life, the Universe and Everything (1982), So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish (1984), Mostly Harmless (1992)

Dirk Gently novels: Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency (1987), The Long, Dark Tea-Time of the Soul (1988)

-1-

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Science Fiction Authors: A Research Guide
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction- Science Fiction Authors- A Research Guide xi
  • Alphabetical Listing of Authors xxi
  • How to Use This Book xxiii
  • Some Notes about the Text xxix
  • Author Entries 1
  • Major Awards 267
  • General Bibliography 271
  • Lists of Authors by Type 279
  • Index 289
  • About the Author 319
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