The Chameleon President: The Curious Case of George W. Bush

By Clarke Rountree | Go to book overview

Chapter 7
The Corporate Crony

Our sixty-day regulatory review of Clinton era regulations, which had
yet to go into effect, caused some public perception problems; when
certain rules were rolled back or weakened, some critics used the deci-
sions to paint Bush as being antienvironmental or more concerned
about corporate interests than with protecting individual Americans
.

—Scott McClellan, President Bush’s White House press secretary1

It is unsurprising that people who spend their lives in a given livelihood
tend to adopt the values, mores, and perspectives of those with whom
they work. Indeed, as an adult this is where most people are socialized
into how to look at, talk, and think about the world. Thus, it is easy
for an advocate to focus on George W. Bush’s MBA and his years as a
businessman and decide that the relationships and perspectives he
gained in interacting with those in the corporate life had a significant
influence on him. This chapter gives voice to the advocate who insists
we view Bush primarily as a corporate crony
.

The high profile of George W. Bush’s role as commander in chief has deflected attention from a much more prominent role running through his eight-year presidency: his function as the friend in chief of Corporate America. Issues of national security, of domestic policy, of environmental policy, of family revenge against Saddam Hussein—you name it—all take

-121-

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The Chameleon President: The Curious Case of George W. Bush
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Chapter 1 - Not the Sharpest Tool in the Shed 1
  • Chapter 2 - The Callow Frat Boy 21
  • Chapter 3 - The Born-Again President 43
  • Chapter 4 - The Conservative Texan 67
  • Chapter 5 - The Man Who Would Be King 81
  • Chapter 6 - The Incredible Oedipal Bush 101
  • Chapter 7 - The Corporate Crony 121
  • Chapter 8 - The Evil President 145
  • Chapter 9 - Cheney’s Puppet 175
  • Chapter 10 - The Victim of Circumstances 201
  • Chapter 11 - The Far-Seeing Patriot 219
  • Conclusion - Would the Real George W. Bush Please Stand Up? 235
  • Notes 241
  • Index 275
  • About the Author 288
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