The Chameleon President: The Curious Case of George W. Bush

By Clarke Rountree | Go to book overview

Chapter 11
The Far-Seeing Patriot

Sophisticates everywhere ridiculed the uncompromising Bush stance,
‘Either you are with us, or you are with the terrorists,’ as a cowboy stunt,
but it was swiftly successful. Governments across the Muslim world
quickly changed their conduct. Some moved energetically to close down
local jihadist groups they had long tolerated, to silence extremist preachers
and to keep out foreign jihadist groups they have previously welcomed
.

—Edward Luttwak1

Finally, we turn to George W. Bush’s own construction of himself. This
is the idea that Bush was more patriotic, more thoughtful, and more
admirable than these other constructions have given him credit for.
Though I cannot attribute this particular construction to the 43rd
president, I suspect he would endorse it and see himself described here.
Below is this book’s most positive advocacy for George W. Bush
.

The first 10 chapters of this book are constructed on a false premise—that the presidency of George W. Bush was a bad one, full of mistakes or selfserving actions that have left this country worse off than when Bush took office. Beginning with that premise, each chapter has attempted to explain the kind of man who yields such a troubled legacy, perhaps someone not very bright or very mature, or driven by religious zeal, cronyism, arrogance, or a desperate need to please his father; or folding in the face of an overbearing vice president or of serious challenges. But perhaps we

-219-

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The Chameleon President: The Curious Case of George W. Bush
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Chapter 1 - Not the Sharpest Tool in the Shed 1
  • Chapter 2 - The Callow Frat Boy 21
  • Chapter 3 - The Born-Again President 43
  • Chapter 4 - The Conservative Texan 67
  • Chapter 5 - The Man Who Would Be King 81
  • Chapter 6 - The Incredible Oedipal Bush 101
  • Chapter 7 - The Corporate Crony 121
  • Chapter 8 - The Evil President 145
  • Chapter 9 - Cheney’s Puppet 175
  • Chapter 10 - The Victim of Circumstances 201
  • Chapter 11 - The Far-Seeing Patriot 219
  • Conclusion - Would the Real George W. Bush Please Stand Up? 235
  • Notes 241
  • Index 275
  • About the Author 288
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