The Cultural Context of Medieval Music

By Nancy Van Deusen | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

Portions of these chapters have appeared in my chapter “Orfeo ed Euridice, Philology and Mercury: Marriage as Metaphor for Relationship within Composition,” in Medieval and Renaissance Humanism: Rhetoric, Representation and Reform, ed. Stephen Gersh and Bert Roest (2003), pp. 31–54.

I express my thanks for the frequent sabbatical leaves provided by Claremont Graduate University, as well as for research funds, research assistants, and travel support attached to the Benezet Chair in the Humanities, which I hold within the department of music.

I am grateful for the stimulating input from audiences around the world who have interacted with the lines of thought expressed in this volume, as well as my colleagues within the Claremont Consortium for Medieval and Early Modern Studies; and the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, University of California, Los Angeles. Many of my colleagues have read chapters, contributed valuable suggestions, and provided an environment highly conducive to intellectual and collegial endeavors.

Finally, I wish to express my heartfelt gratitude to my students in the numerous and diverse university situations over many years— including at Indiana University; the Schola cantorum Basiliensis and University of Basel Institute of Musicology; University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; California State University, Northridge; Central European University, Budapest; the University of New England, Armidale, New South Wales, Australia; and finally and especially, at Claremont Graduate University and the Claremont Colleges—for probing, provocative, questions; stimulating discussions; and most of all, a refusal to be satisfied with conventional explanations. I have been most privileged to have had eager students and have greatly benefited from interactions with them.

-ix-

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