Killing the President: Assassinations, Attempts, and Rumored Attempts on U.S. Commanders-in-Chief

By Willard M. Oliver; Nancy E. Marion | Go to book overview

6
Franklin D. Roosevelt

INTRODUCTION

Franklin Delano Roosevelt was enjoying the few weeks he had to himself between the election of November 1932 and his inauguration day, set for March 4, 1933. Roosevelt was relaxing on Vincent Astor’s private yacht before officially becoming the nation’s leader.1 After a farewell dinner on the yacht with some close friends, Roosevelt climbed into a green Buick convertible for a short public rally at Miami’s Bay Front Park before heading back to Washington. That February 15 was a beautiful, clear night in Miami—perfect for a short public rally for the future president.

That same night, an unemployed bricklayer who was staying temporarily in Miami carried a .32-caliber pistol that he purchased at a local pawn shop to the Bay Front Park and joined an excited crowd of 20,000 citizens there to meet the president-elect. The park was lit up with red, white, and blue floodlights while a drum-and-bugle corps played patriotic songs. After a short, impromptu speech, five shots rang out. Five people were quickly wounded, and the gunman apprehended. His target not only was unharmed but would go on to be elected president three more times.


FRANKLIN ROOSEVELT

Franklin Delano Roosevelt was born on January 30, 1882, in New York. He grew up in a very wealthy family, but was also often sick as a child, contracting both typhoid fever and scarlet fever. His parents frequently took their son overseas as a young boy.2 Through his travels, Franklin learned both French and German, and acquired a lifelong love of the sea.

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Killing the President: Assassinations, Attempts, and Rumored Attempts on U.S. Commanders-in-Chief
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Preface xi
  • 1 - Andrew Jackson 1
  • 2 - Abraham Lincoln 15
  • 3 - James a. Garfield 35
  • 4 - William McKinley 53
  • 5 - Theodore Roosevelt 69
  • 6 - Franklin D. Roosevelt 87
  • 7 - Harry S. Truman 99
  • 8 - John F. Kennedy 113
  • 9 - Gerald R. Ford 131
  • 10 - Ronald Reagan 147
  • 11 - Other Assassination Attempts 161
  • 12 - Rumored Assassinations 181
  • Notes 197
  • Bibliography 219
  • Index 227
  • About the Author 237
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