New Faith: A Black Christian Woman's Guide to Reformation, Re-Creation, Rediscovery, Renaissance, Resurrection, and Revival

By Sheron C. Patterson | Go to book overview

1.
Counter-Cultural
Strut

“Walk while you have light, that the darkness may not
overtake you.” (John 12:35 NAS)

Girlfriend, as Black, Christian, and female, you are awesome times three. But to blossom into the true diva that you are, you can’t just go with the flow. Stop going along to get along. If you know it’s not right, don’t accept it. Move against the grain, counter the culture. Your authentic beauty won’t shine through acquiescence.

That’s what I discovered the hard way. It began when I could not take being treated as “just a woman” anymore. You know the treatment: being looked down on, being looked over for promotions, being ignored, and being expected less of. I’d gone along to get along for over thirtyfive years, until I realized that I was in pain. Being a Black Christian woman in a sexist, racist world hurts. But there is no one to tell. I turned my gaze from what was and looked at what ought to be and the rest of my body followed. I started moving in a direction that countered the rest of the world. To continue on with the ways of this world would betray my own being. “I” became important. My self gained value. It could be silenced and ignored for the so-called common good no more.

-1-

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New Faith: A Black Christian Woman's Guide to Reformation, Re-Creation, Rediscovery, Renaissance, Resurrection, and Revival
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • 1 - Counter-Cultural Strut 1
  • 2 - What New Faith? 14
  • 3 - My Soul Looks Back 34
  • 4 - Revising Ovrselves 48
  • 5 - Sisterhood Future Style 60
  • 6 - Rocking the Cradle and the World 68
  • 7 - Brothers 78
  • 8 - Sins of the Father 89
  • 9 - It’s Time for Love 105
  • 10 - Becoming One Flesh 119
  • 11 - Cleaning Up the House 135
  • 12 - Striving toward the Vision 150
  • Notes 153
  • Suggested Reading 160
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