New Faith: A Black Christian Woman's Guide to Reformation, Re-Creation, Rediscovery, Renaissance, Resurrection, and Revival

By Sheron C. Patterson | Go to book overview

10.
Becoming
One Flesh

“… and they shall become one flesh.” (Gen. 2:24)

When New Faith combines with marriage, it creates a union that makes God smile. (All of her teeth are showing this time.) New Faith finally gives women and men what they deserve from marriage— authentic intimacy. We have been at each other’s throats long enough. Intimacy is the answer. Intimacy cannot exist where husbands are dominating bosses or wives are submissive serfs. Husbands and wives are partners in a sacred trust ordained by God. This partnership creates one flesh from two lives.


New Faith Partnering

Working with our men instead of against them, we can achieve what was unthinkable in the past century. Intimacy means no more games, pretense, or superficial interactions. Intimacy means we can be who we are in a relationship and allow the other person to do the same. “An intimate relationship is one in which neither party silences, sacrifices, or betrays the self and each party expresses strength and vulnerability, weakness and competence in a balanced way.”1

-119-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
New Faith: A Black Christian Woman's Guide to Reformation, Re-Creation, Rediscovery, Renaissance, Resurrection, and Revival
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • 1 - Counter-Cultural Strut 1
  • 2 - What New Faith? 14
  • 3 - My Soul Looks Back 34
  • 4 - Revising Ovrselves 48
  • 5 - Sisterhood Future Style 60
  • 6 - Rocking the Cradle and the World 68
  • 7 - Brothers 78
  • 8 - Sins of the Father 89
  • 9 - It’s Time for Love 105
  • 10 - Becoming One Flesh 119
  • 11 - Cleaning Up the House 135
  • 12 - Striving toward the Vision 150
  • Notes 153
  • Suggested Reading 160
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 160

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.