Culture and Customs of Bolivia

By Javier A. Galván | Go to book overview

Chronology
600 CEThe Tiwanaku culture settled near Lake Titicaca, becoming the oldest civilization established in the highlands of modern-day Bolivia. They left impressive stone-carved monuments. Their descendents are the Aymara and Quechua.
1200Coca leaves were already used for religious purposes.
1300Tiwanaku’s influence receded, and the Inca Empire annexed the area to its vast territory.
1440From Cuzco, the Inca Empire conquered the eastern territories that are now modern-day Bolivia.
1531Spanish expeditions arrived in Ecuador and claimed Alto Peru for the Spanish Crown. Alto Peru would eventually become the nation now called Bolivia.
1536The Spanish conquistadores took control of the Andean Empire. Diego de Almagro ruled the territory that is now Bolivia, which became first known as Charcas and then as Alto Perú, or Upper Peru.
1538Diego de Almagro was assassinated by other feuding Spaniards.
1544Diego Huallpa, an indigenous llama herder, discovered silver in Cerro Rico. The exploitation of the precious metal by the Spanish colonizers turned the nearby city of Potosí into one of the largest in the Western Hemisphere. The mining industry caused the death of

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Culture and Customs of Bolivia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Series Foreword vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Chronology xvii
  • 1 - The Context- Geography, People, and History 1
  • 2 - Religion 27
  • 3 - Social Customs and Lifestyle 43
  • 4 - Literature 75
  • 5 - Broadcasting and Print Media 91
  • 6 - Cinema 111
  • 7 - Performing Arts- Music, Dance, and Theater 125
  • 8 - Architecture, Native Textiles, Visual Arts, and Fashion Design 141
  • Glossary 159
  • Bibliography 163
  • Index 173
  • About the Author 185
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