Culture and Customs of Croatia

By Marilyn Cvitanic | Go to book overview

4
Marriage and Family, Gender Issues,
and Education

MARRIAGE AND FAMILY

Family is the heart of Croatian life. Holidays typically spent with relatives establish traditions and solidify the bond between generations. Perhaps even more important, family members are expected to turn to one another for help with everything ranging from financial problems to child rearing. When one isn’t with family, the relatives become a frequent topic of conversation. Friends often know all about each other’s relationships with siblings, cousins, and elderly relatives.

Croatians not only identify with their immediate family and extended relatives, but also with the town, village, or island where the clan originated. In spite of the fact that many people have migrated from rural ancestral homes to larger cities over the last century, the notion of “hometown” is still important. This affinity for one’s place of origin may be explained by Croatia’s history and familial connections to the land. For centuries, Croatian territory was divided and governed by various European powers. As a result, people who identified themselves as Croatian often were culturally diverse. For example, coastal Dalmatia was historically linked to Venice and Italy, and hence the Italian language was used in schools and in an official capacity until the 20th century. In northern Croatia, the Hungarian influence was much stronger, and therefore the patterns of daily life ranging from cuisine

-65-

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Culture and Customs of Croatia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Series Foreword vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Chronology xiii
  • 1 - Geography and History 1
  • 2 - Religion 43
  • 3 - Civic Values and Political Thought 51
  • 4 - Marriage and Family, Gender Issues, and Education 65
  • 5 - Holidays and Leisure Activities 77
  • 6 - Cuisine and Fashion 91
  • 7 - Literature 107
  • 8 - Media and Cinema 127
  • 9 - Music and Performing Arts 141
  • 10 - Painting and Sculpture 167
  • 11 - Architecture and Housing 193
  • Selected Bibliography 219
  • Index 227
  • About the Author 241
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