Culture and Customs of Croatia

By Marilyn Cvitanic | Go to book overview

9
Music and Performing Arts

THE CLASSICAL TRADITION

For centuries Croatia has maintained a rich and vital musical culture. Early on, the church was the primary repository of notated musical texts, the earliest dating back to 10th century, but music was always a part of daily life as well. A 12th-century manuscript described the visit of Pope Alexander III to Croatia, where he was serenaded by locals singing hymns in the vernacular language. Few Croatians studied Latin and illiteracy was common, so poems, which often were set to song, became a predominant part of Croatia’s early oral and musical tradition. As mentioned in Chapter 7, Petar Hektorovic (1487–1572) was the first to chronicle two Croatian folk songs in his classic poem “Fishing and Fishermen’s Talk.”

The well rehearsed songs and dances that make up the repertoire of Croatian folk ensembles that perform at festivals around the world were not originally created for the stage. Rather, folk songs were played during village celebrations and other social gatherings. To find music that was composed for more formal occasions, we must look to the church where, in cathedrals at least, choirs and organists performed, the earliest being Gregorian Chants that span the 11th through the 15th centuries. Although a number of 16thand 17th-century Croatian composers (most of whom were trained in Italy) still appear in the history books, Ivan Lukacic (ca. 1575–1648), a Franciscan monk who was the organist and choirmaster at the Split Cathedral,

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Culture and Customs of Croatia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Series Foreword vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Chronology xiii
  • 1 - Geography and History 1
  • 2 - Religion 43
  • 3 - Civic Values and Political Thought 51
  • 4 - Marriage and Family, Gender Issues, and Education 65
  • 5 - Holidays and Leisure Activities 77
  • 6 - Cuisine and Fashion 91
  • 7 - Literature 107
  • 8 - Media and Cinema 127
  • 9 - Music and Performing Arts 141
  • 10 - Painting and Sculpture 167
  • 11 - Architecture and Housing 193
  • Selected Bibliography 219
  • Index 227
  • About the Author 241
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